Compiled by Ian James Kidd.

This bibliography first appeared in Ian James Kidd and Liz McKinnell (eds), Science and the Self: Animals, Ethics, and Evolution (Routledge: 2016). Please send any additions or corrections to ian.kidd@nottingham.ac.uk

 

Introduction

It is a sobering experience to compile the writings of Mary Midgley, for two reasons. The first is the sheer quantity of her writings: over two hundred and eighty items are detailed below. The second is the diversity of her outputs. Alongside her single and co-authored books and edited books, there are articles and essays for philosophy journals, scientific periodicals, newspapers, popular environmental and intellectual magazines, as well as pamphlets, prefaces, interviews, forewords, and, in more recent years, podcasts. Midgley speaks clearly and eloquently on many topics to many audiences – a good mark of a ‘public intellectual’.

I have included single and co-authored and edited books, journal articles and book chapters, pamphlets;, and forewords and prefaces. I also added some selected interviews, videos, and podcasts. I have not included translations, reprints, or reviews. My bibliographical efforts were made much easier by the ‘Bibliography of the Works of Mary Midgley’ in The Essential Mary Midgley, and to the wonderful resource that is Google Books. Any additions or corrections will be gladly received. Asterixed items were published under the name Mary Scrutton.

 

Books

  • Beast And Man: The Roots of Human Nature (London: Routledge, 1978).
  • Heart and Mind: The Varieties of Moral Experience (London: Routledge, 1981).
  • Animals and Why They Matter: A Journey Around the Species Barrier (Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, 1983).
  • Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay (London: Routledge, 1984)
  • (co-authored with Judith Hughes) Women’s Choices: Philosophical Problems Facing Feminism (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1983).
  • Can’t We Make Moral Judgements? (Bristol: The Bristol Press, 1989).
  • Wisdom, Information and Wonder: What Is Knowledge For? (London: Routledge, 1989).
  • Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and Its Meaning(London: Routledge, 1992).
  • The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality (London: Routledge, 1994).
  • Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature, revised edition (London: Routledge, 1995).
  • Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems of Philosophical Plumbing (London: Routledge, 1996).
  • Science and Poetry (London: Routledge, 2001).
  • Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears, with a new introduction (London: Routledge, 2002).
  • Myths We Live By (London: Routledge, 2003).
  • The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir (London: Routledge, 2005).
  • The Essential Mary Midgley, David Midgley (ed.) (London: Routledge, 2005) .
  • The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene (Durham: Acumen, 2010).
  • Are you an Illusion? (Durham: Acumen, 2014).

 

Edited volumes

  •  (ed.) Intersubjectivity and John Ziman’s Legacy, edited with Joan Solomon, Journal of Consciousness Studies 13, no. 5 (2006).
  • (ed.) Earthy Realism: The Meaning of Gaia (Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2007).

 

Pamphlets

  • Biological and Cultural Evolution: Institute for Cultural Research Monograph Series, No. 20 (Tunbridge Wells: Institute for Cultural Research, 1984)
  • ‘The Value of “Useless” Research: Supporting Scholarship for the Long Run’, Report by the Council for Science and Society (London: The Council for Science and Society, 1989).
  • Gaia: The Next Big Idea (London: Demos, 2001)
  • Impact Pamphlet 15: Intelligent Design and Other Ideological Problems (London: The Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, 2007)

Articles, book chapters, and letters

  •  ‘An Intellectual Novelist’, The Listener issue 1164 (1951), 993.*
  • ‘The Natural History of Contradictions’, The Listener issue 1180 (1951), 589.*
  • ‘Paradoxography’, The Listener issue 1183 (1951), 743.*
  • ‘The Woman’s Point of View’, The Listener issue 1204 (1952), 510.*
  • ‘The Emancipation of Women’, The Twentieth Century CLII, no. 901 (1952), 217-25.*
  • ‘Bishop Butler: A Reply’, The Twentieth Century CLII, no. 905 (1952), 56-62.*
  • ‘Bourgeois Cinderellas’, The Twentieth Century CLV (1954), 351-63.*
  • ‘Newcastle: Comments on a Case-history’, The Twentieth Century CLIX (1956), 159-68.*
  • ‘Addition to Fiction’, The Twentieth Century CLIX (1956), 567-68.*
  • ‘On Being Reformed’, The Listener issue 1428 (1956), 196.*
  • ‘Ou Sont les Neiges de ma Tante’, The Twentieth Century (1959), 168–79.*
  • ‘The Month’, The Twentieth Century CLXV (1959), 505-10.*
  • ‘Is “Moral” Dirty Word?’, Philosophy 47 , no. 181 (1972), 206–28.
  • ‘The Concept of Beastliness’, Philosophy 48, no. 148 (1973), 111-35.
  • ‘The Neutrality of the Moral Philosopher’, Supplementary Volume of the Aristotelian Society for 1974 (1974), 211–29
  • ‘The Game Game’, Philosophy 49, no. 189 (1974), 231–53.
  • ‘On Trying Out One’s New Sword on a Chance Wayfarer’, The Listener, 15 December 1977.
  • ‘More about Reason, Commitment and Social Anthropology’, Philosophy 53, no. 205 (1978), pp. 401–03.
  • ‘The Objection to Systematic Humbug’, Philosophy 53, no. 204 (1978), 147–69.
  • ‘Freedom and Heredity, The Listener, 14 September 1978.
  • ‘Animal Experiments’, New Scientist 77, no. 1087 (1978), 240.
  • ‘Animals’, New Scientist 78, no. 1097 (1978), 42.
  • ‘Brutality and Sentimentality’, Philosophy 54, no. 209, (1979), 385–89.
  • ‘The All-Female Number’, Philosophy 54, no. 210 (1979), 552–54.
  • ‘Gene-Juggling’, Philosophy 54, no. 210 (1979), 439–58.
  • ‘Selfish Genes’, New Scientist 81, no. 1139 (1979), 278.
  • ‘Beast and Man’, The Listener issue 2624 (1979), 212.
  • ‘Coals To…’, New Scientist 84, no. 1180 (1979), 464.
  • ‘The Absence of a Gap between Facts and Values’, co-authored with Stephen R. L. Clark), Supplementary Volume of the Aristotelian Society for 1980 , 207–223.
  • ‘Consequentialism and Common Sense’, The Hastings Center Report 10, no. 5 (1980), 43-4.
  • ‘Reply to Mr. Pratt’, Philosophical Books 21, no. 1 (1980), 6-9.
  • ‘Why Knowledge Matters’, in David Sperlinger (ed.), Animals in Research: New Perspectives in Animal Experimentation (Oxford: John Wiley and Sons, 1981), 319-36.
  • ‘Towards a New Understanding of Human Nature: The Limits of Individualism’, in Donald J. Ortner (ed.), How Humans Adapt: A Biocultural Odyssey (Washington DC: Smithsonian Press, 1983), 517-46.
  • ‘Selfish Genes and Social Darwinian’, Philosophy 58, no. 225 (1983), 365-77.
  • ‘Duties Concerning Islands’, Encounter LX (February 1983), 36-43.
  • ‘Human Ideals and Human Needs’, Philosophy 58, no. 223 (1983), 89–94.
  • ‘Sneering At Philosophy’, New Scientist 98, no. 1363 (1983, 887
  • ‘De-Dramatizing Darwin’, The Monist 67, no. 2 (1984), 200-15.
  • ‘Sociobiology’, Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (1984), 158-60.
  • ‘On Being Terrestrial’, in S.C. Brown (ed.), Objectivity and Cultural Divergence: Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 17 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), 79-91.
  • ‘Reductivism, Fatalism, and Sociobiology’, Journal of Applied Philosophy 1, no. 1 (1984), 107-14.
  • ‘Persons and Non-Persons’, in Peter Singer (ed.), In Defence of Animals (Oxford: Blackwell, 1985), 52-62.
  • ‘Philosophising Out In The World’, Social Research 52, no. 3 (1985), 447-70.
  • ‘Correspondence’, with Anthony Flew, Journal of Applied Philosophy 2, no. 2 (1985), 293-94.
  • ‘Lorenz Maligned’, New Scientist no. 1521 (1986), 53.
  • ‘Can Specialisation Damage Your Health?’, International Journal of Moral and Social Studies 2, no. 1 (1987).
  • ‘Keeping Species on Ice’, in Virginia MacKenna, Will Travers and Jonathan Wray (eds.), Beyond the Bars: The Zoo Dilemma (Wellingborough: Thorsons, 1987), 55-65.
  • ‘The Flight From Blame’, Philosophy 62, no. 241 (1987), 271-91.
  • ‘Embarrassing Relatives: Changing Perceptions of Animals’, The Trumpeter 4, no. 4 (1987), 17-19.
  • ‘Evolution as a Religion: A Comparison of Prophecies’, Zygon 22, no. 22 (1987), 179-94.
  • ‘Scientific Whaling’, New Scientist no. 1569 (1987), 73
  • ‘Tribal Warfare’, New Scientist no. 1583 (1987), 73.
  • ‘Beasts, Brutes, and Monsters’, in Tim Ingold (ed.), What Is An Animal? (London: Unwin Hyman, 1988), 35-46.
  • ‘Teleological Theories of Morality’, in G.H.R. Parkinson (ed.), An Encyclopedia of Philosophy (London: Routledge, 1988), 541-67.
  • ‘Open Letter’, Philosophy 63, no. (1988), 1-2.
  • ‘On Not Being Afraid of Natural Sex Differences’, in Morwenna Griffiths and Margaret Whitford (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Philosophy (London: Macmillan, 1988), 29-41.
  • ‘Practical Solutions’, The Hastings Center Report 19, no. 6 (1989),  44–5.
  • ‘Myths of Intellectual Isolation’, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, LXXXIX, Part 1 (1988–89), 19- 32.
  • ‘Are You An Animal?’, in Gill Langley (ed.), Animal Experimentation: The Consensus Changes (New York: Chapman & Hall, 1989), 1-18.
  • ‘Why Smartness is Not Enough’, in Mary E. Clark and Sandra A. Wawritko (eds.), Rethinking the Curriculum; Towards an Integrated, Interdisciplinary College Education (New York: Greenwood Press, 1990), 39-52.
  • ‘Homunculus Trouble, or, What is Applied Philosophy?’, Journal of Social Philosophy 21, no. 1 (1990), 5–15.
  • ‘The Use and Uselessness of Learning’, European Journal of Education 25, no.3 (1990), 283–94.
  • ‘Rights Talk Will Not Sort Out Child Abuse: Comment on Archard on Parental Rights’, Journal of Applied Philosophy 8, no. 1 (1991), 103-14.
  • ‘The Origin of Ethics’, in Peter Singer (ed.), A Companion to Ethics (Oxford: Blackwell, 1991), 3-13.
  • ‘Is the Biosphere a Luxury?’, The Hastings Center Report 22, no. 3, (1992), 7–12
  • ‘Towards a More Humane View of the Beasts?’, in David E. Cooper and Joy A. Palmer (eds.), The Environment in Question (London: Routledge, 1992), 28-36.
  • ‘The Significance of Species’, in Steven Luper-Foy and Curtis Brown (eds.), The Moral Life (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992).
  • ‘Philosophical Plumbing’, in A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), The Impulse to Philosophise: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 33 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 139-51.
  • ‘Reply to Marc Bekoff’, Environmental Values 1, no. 3 (1992), 256.
  • ‘Strange Contest, Science versus Religion’, in Hugh Montefiore (ed.), The Gospel and Contemporary Culture (London: Mowbray, 1992), 40-57.
  • ‘Beasts versus the Biosphere’, Environmental Values 1, no. 1 (1992), 113–21
  • ‘The idea of Salvation Through Science’, New Blackfriars 73, no. 860 (1992), 257–65.
  • ‘Can Science Save its Soul? Some Scientists Have Begun To Talk Confidently About Understanding God And Creation. They Are Crediting Science With Power It Doesn’t Possess’, New Scientist 1832 (1992), 43–6
  • ‘The Four-Leggeds, The Two-Leggeds and the Wingeds’, Society and Animals 1, no. 1 (1993), 9-15.
  • ‘Must Good Causes Compete?’, Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2, no. 2 (1993), 133-42.
  • ‘Intelligence Strikes’, New Scientist 138, issue 1870 (1993), 51
  • ‘Visions, Secular and Sacred’, Milltown Studies 34 (1994), 74–93.
  • ‘The End of Anthropocentrism?’, in Robin Attfield and Andrew Belsey (eds.), Philosophy and the Natural Environment: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), 103-112.
  • ‘Darwinism and Ethics’, in K. W. M. Fulford, Grant Gillett & Janet Martin Soskice (eds.), Medicine and Moral Reasoning (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), 6-18.
  • ‘Bridge-Building at Last’, in Aubrey Manning and James Serpell (eds.), Animals and Human Society: Changing Perspectives (London: Routledge, 1994), 188-94.
  • ‘Matter of Choice’, New Scientist 141, issue 1912 (1994), 50.
  • ‘Zombies and the Turing Test’, Journal of Consciousness Studies 2, no. 4 (1995), 351–2.
  • ‘Reductive Megalomania’, in John Cornwell (ed.), Nature’s Imagination: The Frontiers of Scientific Vision (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), 133-147.
  • ‘Trouble with Families?’, co-authored with Judith Hughes, in Brenda Almond (ed.), Introducing Applied Ethics (Oxford: Blackwell, 1995), 17-32.
  • ‘The Challenge of Science, Limited Knowledge, or a New High Priesthood?’, in Alan Race and Roger Williamson (eds.), True to this Earth: Global Challenges and Transforming Faith (Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 1995).
  • ‘The Mixed Community’, in James P. Sterba (ed.), Earth Ethics, Environmental Ethics, Animal Rights and Practical Applications (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1995), 80-90.
  • ‘Visions, Secular and Sacred’, The Hastings Center Report 25, no. 5 (1995), 20–7.
  • ‘Darwin’s Central Problems’, Science 268, no. 5214 (1995), 1196–98.
  • ‘The Ethical Primate. Anthony Freeman in discussion with Mary Midgley’, Journal of Consciousness Studies 2, no. 1 (1995), 67–75..
  • ‘Sustainability and Moral Pluralism’, Ethics and the Environment 1, no. 1 (1996), 41-54.
  • ‘One World – But a Big One’, Journal of Consciousness Studies 3, no. 5/6 (1996), 500-14.
  • ‘Earth Matters; Thinking about the Environment’, in Sarah Dunant and Roy Porter (eds.), The Age of Anxiety (London: Virago, 1996), 59-62.
  • ‘The View from Britain: What is Dissolving Families?’, co-authored with Judith Hughes, American Philosophical Association, Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 96, no. 1 (1996).
  • ‘Can Education be Moral?’ Res Publica 2, no. 1 (1996), 77-85.
  • ‘Science in the World’, Science Studies 9, no. 2 (1996), 49-58.
  • ‘Pi In the Sky’, Third Way 19, no. 2 (1996), 11-14.
  • ‘Visions of Embattled Science’, in Ralph Levinson and Jeff Thomas (eds.), Science Today: Problem or Crisis? (London: Routledge, 1997), 35-50.
  • ‘The Soul’s Successors: Philosophy and the “Body”’, in Sarah Coakley (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 53-70.
  • ‘Are Families Out of Date?’, co-authored with Judith Hughes, in Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families (London: Routledge, 1997), 55-68.
  • ‘Skimpole Unmasked’, History of the Human Sciences 10, no. 4 (1997), 92-6.
  • ‘Putting Ourselves Together Again’, in John Cornwall (ed.), Consciousness and Human Identity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998).
  • ‘The Problem of Humbug’, in Matthew Kieran (ed.), Media Ethics: A Philosophical Approach (London: Routledge, 1998), 37-48.
  • ‘Dawkins Determinant’, New Scientist 157, issue 2121 (1998), 51-52.
  • ‘The Myths We Live By’, in Wes Williams (ed.), The Values of Science: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1997 (New York: Westview Press, 1999).
  • ‘Being Scientific about Our Selves’, Journal of Consciousness Studies 6, no. 4 (1999), 85-98.
  • ‘Should We Let Them Go?’, in Francine L. Dolins (ed.), Attitudes to Animals: Views in Animal Welfare (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 152-63.
  • ‘Determinism, Omniscience, and the Multiplicity of Explanations’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22, no. 5 (1999), 900-901.
  • ‘Towards an Ethic of Global Responsibility’, inTim Dunne and Nicholas J. Wheeler (eds.), Human Rights in Global Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999), 160-74.
  • ‘Midgley on Murdoch’ The Philosophers’ Magazine 7 (1999), 45-46.
  • ‘Descartes’ Prisoners’, New Statesman, 24 May 1999.
  • ‘Me And My Memes’, New Scientist 161, issue 2179 (1999), 56.
  • ‘Just So Stories’, New Scientist 163, issue 2205 (1999), 55.
  • ‘Brutal Kinship’, Nature 399, issue 6736 (1999), 537.
  • ‘Monkey business. The Origin of Species changed man’s conception of himself forever. So why, asks Mary Midgley, is Darwinism used to reinforce the arid individualism of our age?’, New Statesman, 6 September 1999.
  • ‘The Origins of Don Giovanni’, Philosophy Now 25 (1999-2000), 32.
  • ‘Alchemy Revived’, The Hastings Center Report 30, no. 2 (2000), 41–3.
  • ‘Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why We Should Pay Attention to the “Yuk Factor”’, The Hastings Center Report 30, no. 5 (2000), 7–15.
  • ‘Sorting Out The Zeigeist’, Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education 7, no. 1 (2000), 89-92.
  • ‘Both Nice and Nasty’, New Statesman, 13 March 2000.
  • ‘Earth Song’, New Statesman, 2 October 2000.
  • ‘The Need for Wonder’, in Russell Stannard (ed.), God For the 21st Century (Radnot: Templeton Foundation Press, 2000), 186-88.
  • ‘Individualism and the Concept of Gaia’, Review of International Studies 26 (2000), 29-44.
  • ‘Consciousness, Fatalism and Science’, in Niels Hendrik Gregerson, Willem B.Drees and Ulf Gorman (eds.), The Human Person in Science and Theology (Edinburgh, T&T Clark, 2000), 21-40.
  • ‘Human Nature, Human Variety, Human Freedom’, Neil Roughley (ed.), Being Humans: Anthropological Universality and Particularity in Transdisciplinary Perspectives (Berlin: Walter De Gruyter, 2000), 47-63.
  • ‘Why Memes?’, in Hilary Rose and Steven Rose (eds.), Alas, Poor Darwin: Arguments Against Evolutionary Psychology (London: Jonathan Cape Rosenthal, 2000), 67–84.
  • ‘Individualism and the Concept of Gaia’, in Ken Booth, Tim Dunne, and Michael Cox (eds.), How Might We Live? Global Ethics in a New Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), 29-44.
  • ‘Homage to Gaia: The Life of an Independent Scientist’, Environmental Values 10, no. 1 (2001), 141-42.
  • ‘The Problem of Living With Wildness’, in Virginia A.Sharpe, Bryan Norton and Strachan Donelley (eds.) Wolves and Human Communities, Biology, Politics and Ethics, (Washington: Island Press 2001), 179-90.
  • ‘Walk on the Dark Side’, The Philosophers’ Magazine 14 (2001), 23-5.
  • ‘Being Objective: The Idea of Scientists As Impartial Observers Is Hard To Shake, But Is Complete Detachment Justified?’, Nature 410, no. 753 (2001), 753.
  • ‘The bankers’ vision is limited’, The Guardian, 24 August 2001.
  • ‘The bankers’ abstract vision of the globe is limited’, The Guardian, 4 October 2001.
  • ‘The Refractory: Vision’, The Lancet 357, no. 9266 (2001), 1455.
  • ‘Animal Thoughts’, New Scientist 171, issue 2301 (2001), 71.
  • ‘Heaven and Earth, an Awkward History’, Philosophy Now 34 (2001-2002) p. 18
  • ‘Does the Earth Concern Us?’, Gaia Circular (2001-2002), 4-9.
  • ‘Choosing the Selectors’, in Michael Wheeler, John Ziman and Margaret A. Boden (eds.), The Evolution of Cultural Entities: Proceedings of the British Academy 112 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), 119-33.
  • ‘Reply to Target Article: “Inventing the Subject; the Renewal of ’Psychological’ Psychology”’, Journal of Anthropological Psychology 11 (2002), 44-45.
  • ‘Pluralism: The Many Maps Model’, Philosophy Now 35 (2002), 10-11.
  • ‘How Real Are You?’, Think 1, no. 2 (2002), 35-46.
  • ‘Enough is never enough’, The Guardian, 28 November 2002.
  • ‘It’s all in the mind’, The Guardian, 21 September 2002.
  • ‘Understanding the ‘War on Terrorism’, openDemocracy, 24 October 2002.
  • ‘The Problem of Natural Evil’, in Charles Talliaferro and Paul J. Griffiths (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003), 361-367.
  • ‘Fate by fluke’, The Guardian, 1 March 2003.
  • ‘Curiouser and curisouser’, The Guardian, 27 September 2003.
  • ‘Science and Poetry’, Situation Analysis 2 (2003), 29-31.
  • ‘Great Thinkers – James Lovelock’, New Statesman, 14 July 2003.
  • ‘Criticising the Cosmos’, in Willem B. Drees (ed.), Is Nature Ever Evil? Religion, Science and Value (London: Routledge, 2003), 11-26, with replies by Silvia Volker and Hans Radder,
  • ‘Mind and Body: The End of Apartheid’, in David Lorimer (ed.). Science, Consciousness and Ultimate Reality (Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2004), 173-197.
  • ‘Science and Poetry’, John Haldane (ed.), Values, Education, and the Human World (Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2004), 219-233,
  • ‘Atoms, Memes, and Individuals’, in John Haldane (ed.), Values, Education, and the Human World (Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2004), 234-249.
  • ‘Do We Even Act?’, in Dai A. Rees and Steven Rose (eds.), The New Brain Sciences: Perils and Prospeccts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), 17-33.
  • ‘Why Clones?’, Network Review (The Scientific and Medical Network) 84 (2004).
  • ‘Zombies Can’t Concentrate’, Philosophy Now 44 (2004), 13-14.
  • ‘Counting the cost of revenge’, The Guardian, 5 June 2004.
  • ‘Us and Them’, New Statesman, 13 September 2004.
  • ‘Souls, Minds, Bodies, and Planets (part 1)’, Philosophy Now 47 (2004),
  • ‘Souls, Minds, Bodies, and Planets (part s)’, Philosophy Now 48 (2004).
  • ‘On the Origin of Creationism’, New Scientist, issue 2479 (2004), 29.
  • ‘Souls, Minds, Bodies, and Planets’, in Anthony O’Hear (ed.), Philosophy, Biology, and Life: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 56 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), 83-104.
  • ‘Mixed Antitheses’, in James E. Huchingson (ed.), Religion and the Natural Sciencs: The Range of Engagement (Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2005),6-39.
  • ‘Visions and Values’, Resurgence 228 (2005), 18.
  • ‘Designs on Darwinism’, The Guardian, 6 September 2005.
  • ‘Proud not to be a doctor’, The Guardian 3 October 2005.
  • ‘Mapping Science: In Memory of John Ziman’, Interdisciplinary Science Reviews 30, no. 3 (2005), 195-7.
  • ‘Imagine there’s no heaven’, New Scientist 192, issue 2572 (2006), 50-51.
  • ‘Ways of seeing’, New Scientist 192, issue 2578 (2006), 25.
  • ‘Rethinking Sex and the Selfish Gene: Why We Do It’, Heredity 93, no. 3 (2006), 271-2.
  • ‘Dover Beach Revisited’, Think 4, no. 12 (2006), 69-74.
  • ‘Dover Beach Revisited’, in Philip Clayton and Zachary Simpson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), 962-78.
  • ‘Dover Beach: Understanding the Pains of Bereavement’, Philosophy 81, no.2 (2006), 209-30.
  • ‘Editorial Introduction’, Journal of Consciousness Studies 13, no. 5 (2006), 8-16.
  • ‘Introduction: The Not-So-Simple Earth’, in Mary Midgley (ed.), Earthy Realism: The Meaning of Gaia (Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2007), 3-9.
  • ‘What Do We Mean By Security?’, Philosophy Now 61 (2007), 12-15.
  • ‘A Plague on Both Their Houses’, Philosophy Now 64 (2007), 26-27.
  • The Flawed Frontier’, New Scientist 195, issue 2623 (2007), 22.
  • ‘Elementary, Watson’, New Scientist 196, issue 2630 (2007), 23.
  • ‘Crimes beyond religion’, The Guardian, 30 September 2006.
  • ‘Mary Midgley on Dawkins’, Interlog: Exploring Buddhist-Christian Christian-Buddhist Themes, 10 August 2007.
  • ‘Why Farm Animals Matter’, in M. Dawkins and R. Bonney (eds.), The Future of Animal Farming: Renewing the Ancient Contract (Oxford: Blackwell, 2008), 21-32.
  • ‘Does Science Make Belief in God Obsolete? Of Course Not’, John Templeton Foundation (2008), http://www.templeton.org/belief/essays/midgley.pdf.
  • ‘Love and its Disappointment’, Philosophy Now 75 (2008), 42.
  • ‘Proud not to be a doctor’, The Guardian, 3 October 2008.
  • ‘Cold wars and grand conclusions’, The Guardian, 28 October 2008.
  • ‘All too human’, The Guardian, 19 December 2008.
  • ‘Reason is just another faith’, New Scientist 199, issue 2666 (2008), 50-51.
  • ‘Thinking matter’, New Scientist 201, issue 2688 (2008), 16.
  • ‘Mary Midgley’, in Mick Gordon and Chris Wilkinson (eds.), Conversations on Truth (London: Continuum, 2009), 142-154..
  • ‘Purpose, Meaning and Darwinism’, Philosophy Now 71 (2009), 16-19.
  • ‘Selectionism can only take us so far’, The Guardian, 9 February 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 1: Strange selves’, The Guardian, 6 April 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 2: Freedom and desolation’, The Guardian, 13 April 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 3: What is selfishness?’, The Guardian, 20 April 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 4: Selling total freedom’, The Guardian, 27 April 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 5: The end of individualism’, The Guardian, 4 May 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 6: Responses to readers’, The Guardian, 11 May 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 7: His idea of war’, The Guardian,18 May 2009.
  • ‘Hobbes’ Leviathan, part 8: Can we ride the Leviathan?’, The Guardian, 25 May 2009.
  • ‘Formulas built in myth’, The Guardian, 15 August 2009.
  • ‘Religious agena’, New Scientist 201, issue 2700 (2009), 22-23.
  • ‘Darwinism, Purpose and Meaning’, in Anthony O’Hear (ed.), Philosophy and Religion: Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 193-201.
  • ‘What Darwin got wrong’, The Guardian, 6 February 2010.
  • ‘The abuses of science’, The Guardian, 12 June 2010.
  • ‘Metaphysics and the limits of science’, The Guardian, 28 August 2010.
  • ‘There are truths far too big to be conveyed in one go’, The Guardian 27 December 2010.
  • ‘Moral brains’, New Scientist 208, issue 2788 (2010), 29.
  • ‘Why The Idea of Purpose Won’t Go Away’, Philosophy 86 (2011), 545-61.
  • ‘The Mythology of Selfishness’, The Philosophers’ Magazine 53 (2011), 35-45.
  • ‘Lost in space’, New Scientist 211, issue 2823 (2011), 28.
  • ‘Age is a continuum – not two tribes to be made equal’, The Guardian 14 November 2011.
  • ‘The selfish metaphor: Conceits of evolution’, New Scientist 209, issue 2797 (2011), 26-27.
  • ‘Existential issues’, with Peter Hacker, Jane Heal, and Anthony O’Hear, New Scientist 211, issue 2829 (2011), 32.
  • ‘On Being An Anthrozoon: How Unique Are We?’, Minding Nature: A Journal of the Center for Humans and Nature, 5, no. 2 (2012), 11-16.
  • ‘Choose free will’, New Scientist 215, issue 2880 (2012), 30.
  • ‘Getting real’, New Scientist 216, issue 2887 (2012), 30.
  • ‘Death and the Human Animal’, Philosophy Now 89 (2012).
  • ‘Two become one’, New Scientist 217, issue 2909 (2013), 30.
  • ‘Art of psychiatry’, New Scientist 218, issue 2916 (2013), 30-31.
  • ‘Does Philosophy Get Out of Date?’, Philosophy Now 103 (2014).
  • ‘Scientism and Free-market Jihad’, openDemocracy, 19 November 2014, https://www.opendemocracy.net/mary-midgley/scientism-and-freemarket-jihad
  • ‘Interview: Philosopher Mary Midgley – thinker, writer … and nemesis of the selfish gene’, Herald Scotland, 31 March 2015.
  • ‘A Golden Manifesto, Part I’, Philosophy Now 116, 2016.
  • ‘A Golden Manifesto, Part II’, Philosophy Now 117.
  • ‘Science, scientism, and the self’, video talk Ian Ramsey Centre for the Humane Philosophy project, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekp1hEjtPsQ
  • ‘In Search of the Self: Simon Blackburn, Mary Midgley, an Colin Blakemore’, The Institute of Art and Ideas, https://soundcloud.com/instituteofartandideas/in-search-of-the-self 

Undated writings

 

Forewords

  • ‘Foreword’ to Georg Breuer, Sociobiology and the Human Dimension (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983), ix-xii
  • ‘Foreword’ to Eric Walter Frederick Tomlin, Psyche, Culture, and the New Science; The Role of PN (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1985), viii.
  • ‘Foreword’ to Alex Bentley (ed.), The Edge of Reason? Science and Religion in Modern Society (London: Continuum, 2008), xvii-xxiv .
  • ‘Foreword’ to Iris Murdoch, The Sovereighty of Good (London: Routledge, 2014), x-xvi.
  • ‘Foreword’, to M. O’Brien, Dialogue and the Discursive Character of the Academic Discipline: Rethinking Widening Participation from the ‘Inside-out’. University of Liverpool, 2008.
  • ‘Foreword’ to Rebekah Humphreys and Sophie Vlacos (eds.), Creation, Environment and Ethics (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010), vii-viii.
  • ‘Foreword’ to Michael Bavidge, Mad or Bad? (Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1989).
  • ‘Foreword’ to Mark Thornton, Do We Have Free Will? ((Bristol: Bristol Classical Press, 1989).

Unsourced writings